Riverwalk Cafe Ole, Part 2


Thank you to those of you who gave suggestions of how to "fix" the water in this painting. I've darkened and simplified the patterns somewhat and tidied up a couple of umbrellas and added a bulb or two to the string of lights on the right. What thinketh thee now, O landscape artists Supreme? Is it still too busy in the water area?

16 comments:

Pattie said...

I am not the Supreme one, but I think you worked magic with the 'water'. I like it just the way you have corrected it!

Jo Castillo said...

I like it too, the reflections lead the eye right in. You did well, busy bee.

rob ijbema said...

yes the water is very catching,not to busy at all,i like the umbrellas too,a very cheerful painting.

Barbara Pask said...

Hi Susan, I struggle with landscapes so I'm sure not one to give advice but I know what I like and I like it! The like the reflections, not much detail just the reflections of colors. You are a painting machine, you accomplish so much. I love the one hour portraits you're doing. If you figure out a way to pack up wet paintings you'll have to pass it on. Barb

Susan Carlin said...

Thanks, Barbara. The way I packed the wet commissioned portrait was to put it in its frame and sandwich it between two pieces of foamcore the same size as the frame(the frame held the foamcore away from the wet surface), and two narrow pieces of foamcore for the sides, then taped it securely around. Then I wrapped the whole thing in a large sheet of acetate (I have a large roll of the stuff), then put it in a cardboard box a bit bigger than the package with a couple of extra pieces of foam core on either side. Then I stuffed bubblewrap all around and sealed it up. I dare anything to touch the paint! I did insure it, though.

Barbara Pask said...

Thanks Susan, This is great info to pass along. It's wonderful to have this network of artists sharing tips and advice. Take care, Barb

Dianne Mize said...

That Supreme person hasn't answered yet, but while we're waiting, I'll say you've done very well indeed. It works now! So you'll have to include yourself among landscapers now, you know.

Susan Carlin said...

Thank you, Dianne. You reign supreme in my book. I'm going to say it's done, sign it, and move on. I hope to feel better about landscapes down the line. In the meantime, I need to earn my chops by painting more of them. Softening edges seems to be my main hurdle.

Karen Hargett said...

Susan I love this! You did a great job on the water - the colors are beautiful! You should be proud to say you do landscapes in addition to portraits.

Susan Carlin said...

Blessings upon you, Karen!

Cindy said...

I'm not a landscape painter either, but this is really wonderful...I'd like to be sitting by the water in this scene.

Dianne Mize said...

Susan, here's a little tip about softening edges. Use your fingers. When you paint a shape, gently slide a finger ONCE along the edge. Our fingertips are our original paintbrushes. :)

GoneFishin said...

Although I admire your ability with portraits and think you have a special talent with capturing a person's spirit, when I first saw this painting (the first version), I said "Ooohhhhh!" I like all the colors and the reflections. I think you've softened it up just right. I love capturing reflections in my photography efforts, but rarely is it a mirror image. Love this one!

Regina Calton Burchett said...

I absolutely love this!! The colors are wonderful, and it's sooo San Antonio!

Susan Carlin said...

Thank you Cindy, Dianne, Mickey and Regina. Dianne, I promise I'll try using my fingers more. After all these years working in pastel, you'd think I'd still my paws in the paint more often.

Kathryn Law said...

This is a stunner. I'm still laughing about your expression in the original post, that the water "ate my lunch". That says it all! Well, you won that little skirmish, with the changes you made--it's absolutely beautiful now.